Genomic Analyses Reveal the Influence of Geographic Origin, Migration and Hybridization on Modern Dog Breed Development

By | 24th February 2018

Genomic Analyses Reveal the Influence of Geographic Origin, Migration
and Hybridization on Modern Dog Breed Development


by
Heidi G. Parker – Dayna L. Dreger – Maud Rimbault – Brian W. Davis – Alexandra B. Mullen – Gretchen Carpintero-Ramirez – Elaine A. Ostrander

Highlights:

– Neighbor joining cladogram of 161 breeds establishes 23 supported clades
– Crossing between diverse clades was done recently to add new traits
– Migration of a breed to a new region alters both immigrant and indigenous breeds
– Tracking recent crosses can identify the source of mutations in multiply breeds

Parker et al 2017, cell reports 19.697-708
April 25, 2017 (c) 2017 The Author(s)

Summary

There are nearly 400 modern domestic dog breeds with a unique histories and genetic profiles. To track the genetic signatures of breed development, we have assembled the most diverse dataset of dog breeds, reflecting their extensive phenotypic variation and heritage. Combining genetic distance, migration, and genome-wide haplotype sharing analyses, we uncover geographic patterns of development and independent origins of common traits. Our analyses reveal the hydrid history of breeds and elucidate the effects of immigration, revealing for the first time a suggestion of New World dog within some modern breeds. Finally we used cladistics and haplotype sharing to show that some common traits have arisen more than once in the history of the dog. These analyses characterize the complexities of breed development, resolving longstanding questions regarding individual breed origination, the effect of migration on geographically distinct breeds, and, by inference, transfer of traits and diseases alleles of among dog breeds.

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